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Environmental Sustainability

Environmental Sustainability for the World We Want: Moving From the MDGs to Post-2015

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THE WORLD WE WANT

E-Discussion Framing Paper: 

Environmental Sustainability for the World We Want:  Moving From the MDGs to Post-2015

29 January 2013

 

The World We Want initiative aims to gather the priorities of people from every corner of the world and help build a collective vision that will be used directly by the United Nations and World Leaders to plan a new development agenda launching in 2015, one that is based on the aspirations of all citizens.

The World We Want web platform is a joint initiative between the United Nations and Civil Society. The World We Want is a growing movement of people all over the world contributing their vision towards an overall plan to build a just and sustainable world free from poverty. It will help ensure that global efforts to secure a post-2015 development agenda are also based on the perspective of people living in poverty.

Leading up to the year 2015, the United Nations is planning a series of consultations to help shape the post-2015 agenda with support from Civil Society coalitions including the Global Call to Action Against Poverty, World Alliance for Citizen Participation (CIVICUS) and the Beyond 2015 Campaign, who have been organizing Civil Society engagement in post-2015 discussions. This process includes the creation of a High Level Panel, up to 100 national consultations, 11 thematic consultations, and a Global Online Conversation - all of which will contribute to a vision for The World We Want beyond 2015.

One of the eleven major global thematic consultations is on environmental sustainability.

The purpose of this framing document is to propose questions and background to help prompt a global conversation on how lessons from the MDGs and MDG7 can be considered in a post-2015 development framework. This e-discussion will run from February 4 – March 1, 2013 on www.worldwewant2015.org/sustainability.


 

Introduction

This paper frames the first e-discussion for the post-2015 thematic consultation on environmental sustainability to be launched February 4 – March 1, 2013, on www.worldwewant2015.org/sustainability.  .

A series of questions are provided to frame the e-discussion which will focus on learning from the MDGs and MDG7 to help frame environmental sustainability in the post-2015 agenda.  Additional background is also provided to help inform the dialogue including an   An overview of where we stand with MDG7 and environmental sustainability highlighting progress and areas where MDG7 is off-track. This is followed by an outline of various success factors for better environmental sustainability in a future development framework and a number of underlying factors explaining shortfalls of the MDGs, and MDG7 in particular. For the world to meet the environmental sustainability challenge adjustments (or shifts) towards lower intensity development paths, greener growth, improved waste management at all levels, and more sustainable production and consumption patterns are needed.

This paper provides a critique of the shortfalls in the design and implementation of the MDGs and MDG7 specifically.  It also discusses the evolution and implementation of the global development agenda, in the context of MDGs, as a basis for helping us move towards post-2015 goals; to identify the gaps and determine how to better integrate environmental sustainability based on lessons learned from the MDGs.  This paper has been prepared to frame some questions which touch on a backwards review of the MDGs and how this can we used to inform the forward looking process for integrating environmental sustainability in the post-2015 agenda. The framing questions follow this introduction.

The paper primarily borrows conclusions from two UN publications on MDG7, namely the 2010 UNDG Thematic Paper on Environmental Sustainability prepared by 14 UN agencies under UNEP leadership for the 2010 MDG Summit and a 2006 UNDP report on Making Progress on Environmental Sustainability that draws lessons and recommendations from a review of over 150 MDG country experiences. Additional information has been extracted from the discussion notes that have been submitted on the Post-2015 Environmental Sustainability Thematic Consultation website.


 

Framing Questions

 

Week 1: Capitalizing on the MDGs and MDG7 Achievements and Addressing the Gaps

  • How and to what extent can we build on lessons learned from MDG7's achievement in developing our post-2015 development agenda?
  • How can the post-2015 agenda address any gaps related to environmental sustainability in the overall MDG framework?

Week 2:  Addressing Development Challenges in a Changing World

  • Which global trends and uncertainties may influence how environmental sustainability is framed in the international development agenda over the next 10-30 years?
  • What new elements and considerations would need to be incorporated into the post-2015 agenda for it to be environmentally sustainable and adequately capture the essence of the world’s evolving development/financial/social/ economic/ environmental/etc challenges? 

Week 3: Framing Environmental Sustainability in the Post-2015 Agenda

  • In the spirit of the outcomes of Rio+20, what are the barriers and enablers to gradually moving towards environmental sustainability?
  • Building on the MDGs and the outcomes of Rio+20, how would you envisage a conceptual framework for the post-2015 agenda that can help drive a transition to an environmentally sustainable future? What are the key characteristics?
     

Week 4: Consensus and Divergence

The final week will wrap up the e-discussion by identifying areas where there seems to be evolving consensus and also areas where further dialogue is needed.  The moderators will pose a series of questions for the final week based on the outcomes of the first 3-weeks of the discussion.


 

Background and Context

Many have recognized the value of the MDGs, including MDG7, in terms of their shared focus on poverty reduction, their globally accepted set of indicators with clear goals, targets and timeframes to support policy monitoring and accountability, and the comparatively high level of visible political commitment attached to the Goals[1]. Many have also acknowledged that the MDGs provide a common framework and an improved coordination opportunity for development actors and promote concrete actions to address human development issues[2]. “The MDGs have rallied different stakeholders under a single umbrella and created global consensus and contributed for the betterment of life.”[3]  The experience also shows that “global consensus around environment goals can be achieved, and that goal-setting can be a powerful way of motivating, shaping and driving actors to achieve positive outcomes.”[4]  However, many have also argued that the MDGs had important shortcomings which could have been avoided if a more inclusive process had led to their design and content.[5]

Although progress was achieved to reach some of the MDGs, achievement of MDG7 on environmental sustainability by 2015 is mostly off track.[6] While there is progress in some indicators others are critically lagging behind highlighting that progress on environmental sustainability requires a change in the way that development occurs: one that results in lower carbon intensity development paths; greener growth; improved waste management at all levels; and, more sustainable consumption and production patterns[7].

The next set of development goals will no doubt need to be embedded into the broader framework of sustainable development, which demonstrates the values and socio-economic benefits of environmental sustainability to countries and at the global level, and points to responsibilities of all countries.[8]

 

MDG 7: Where Do We Stand?

 

The below table summarizes the MDG 7 targets and indicators:

To measure achievements of the MDGs global MDG Reports have been carried out every year since 2005[9]. The 2012 Report shows that contributions of national Governments, the international community, civil society and the private sector will need to intensify to meet the challenge of inequality, food security, gender equality, maternal health, rural development, infrastructure, environmental sustainability, and responses to climate change[10]. Annex A provides extracts from the latest progress charts for MDG7 from the 2011 and 2012 MDG Reports.

Examples of the global progress towards achieving some MDG 7 targets include: the Montreal Protocol has resulted in the phasing out of the production and consumption of over 98% of all controlled ozone-depleting substances (ODS); the world has met the drinking water target 5 years ahead of schedule, however issues of inequality remain in distribution. Furthermore, as of 2008, 73 countries have protected 10% or more of their national surface area, with 18 nations reaching protected area coverage of 25% or more.

Still, the target on reducing the rate of biodiversity loss by 2010 has not been met. Overall biodiversity is still declining and species are increasingly threatened: nearly 17 000 plant and animal species are known to be threatened with extinction, and major threats and drivers of biodiversity loss, such as including over-consumption, population pressure, habitat loss, invasive species, pollution and climate change, are not yet being effectively tackled.

Regarding the proportion of land area covered by forest, some 13 million hectares of the world’s forests are still being deforested each year even if the rate of net loss of forest area has fallen since the 1990-2000 period at the global level. Furthermore, primary forests – forests with no visible signs of past or present human activities, and which include some of the most biologically diverse ecosystems on the planet – are being lost or modified at a rate of 4 million hectares a year. Whilst the ocean occupies over 70% of Earth’s surface area and over 90% of the biosphere’s volume, less than 2% of the ocean surface is under marine protected areas.

On the rate of growth of CO2, and related global warming, progress is not encouraging either: equivalent emissions was higher during 1995-2004 than during the previous period of 1970-1994; the global trend has not changed so far; and the IPCC reported that eleven of the last twelve years (1995-2006) rank among the twelve warmest years of recorded global surface temperature (since 1850).

Noting that between 1990 and 2008 the proportion of people without improved sanitation decreased by only 7%, the world will not achieve even half of the sanitation target by 2015. Finally, the target on improving the lives of at least 100 million slum dwellers has been met in full but during the same period more than 200 million new slum dwellers have been added to the urban population.

What are the elements of success?

Based on national experiences and lessons learned from MDG7 a series of elements have been identified that support successful integration of environmental sustainability in development efforts. Those elements include:

  • developing comprehensive and coherent development planning frameworks integrating all of the aspects related to environmental sustainability (e.g. poverty reduction, gender equality, health) that are relevant to any given country in a balanced manner;
  • adopting national sustainable development plans and strategies that specifically include MDG 7 related targets and indicators, and linking them to relevant national action plans;
  • incorporating environmental sustainability in all development policies (including amongst others, health, education, and employment) and related national budgets;
  • promoting greener development policy approaches and creating economic incentives through public-private partnerships;
  • harnessing science, technology and innovation for innovative solutions;involving all relevant stakeholders in the planning, programming and budgeting cycle to implement the national plans;
  • integrating the perspective of culture and of local stakeholders into environmental sustainability policies;
  • ensuring that the traditional knowledge, cultural resources and practices which contribute to environmental sustainability are fully taken into account in development strategies and policies;
  • ensuring the ability of all stakeholders/the whole population to contribute to implementing environmental sustainability through education, public awareness and training;
  • recognizing efforts to ensure rural-urban linkages and addressing those issues in national development strategies;
  • implementing development projects that cut across the MDG ‘silos’, and address all 8 MDGs in an integrated manner  (an example can be found in the “widespread use of solar cookers… The European Commission and solar cooker experts estimate that 165 to 200 million households could benefit from solar cookers.[11]);
  • adopting strong national legislation with mandatory targets and commitments towards the attainment of sustainable development objectives. This involves not adopting mechanically the global targets and indicators, but rather tailoring them to national development policies and priorities, local context, and ecosystem specificities by, inter alia, assessing countries environmental issues, identifying existing priorities, setting country specific and verifiable targets, selecting indicators and establishing a baseline to track progress;
  • having strong international and/or regional frameworks that promote global partnerships, coordinated action and cooperation, fostering policy coherence with related frameworks including those on disaster risk reduction and ocean governance;
  • adopting strong international and/or regional (i.e. trans-boundary) regulatory frameworks;
  • providing fiscal investments for the attainment of the goals and multilateral funding to supplement national resources;
  • developing national monitoring systems to track progress and ensuring institutional and organizational capacity to do so.

What factors explain MDG 7 shortfalls?

A series of factors explaining the shortfalls in achieving MDG7 targets have been identified[12] and also reflected in several of the submitted discussion notes on the Environmental Sustainability Thematic Consultation platform. Some of these shortfalls and challenges are highlighted below:

  • Lack of data: Many countries are just initiating MDG7 data collection and monitoring efforts, and some are finding it difficult to allocate the proper resources[13]. According to the UNDP review of national MDG reports in 2006, apart from access to water, less than half of countries had reported sufficient data for monitoring progress.  It should be noted that with several indicators added in 2008 additional data and reporting has occurred in recent years but there is still lack of scientific capacities to for the provision of reliable scientific information, data, and statistics.
  • Weak linkages: Links between MDG 7 and other MDGs are rarely made in the MDG country reports. If environmental issues are discussed in the context of the other goals, the causal link between poverty and the environment is not well articulated nor a response developed. MDG 7 is fragmented and does not integrate the different components of environmental sustainability well. While MDG 7 contains elements that contribute to environmental sustainability, those elements do not provide a full picture. Indicators on forestry and protected areas for example do not reflect critical changes affecting the poor such as land degradation and desertification, although improvements in protection and management of forests and other systems are of particular relevance to the rural poor who rely more directly on biodiversity and natural resources. “Poverty reduction and biodiversity or ecosystem degradation are deeply intertwined and have roots in social, environmental and economic complexities. These can be dealt with building partnerships at local or regional scale and by fostering institutions which are embedded within communities.”[14] This lack of linkages can be exacerbated at the national level if countries mechanically adopt the global set of targets and indicators without explicitly linking or tailoring them to national priorities and conditions[15].  The science-policy interface needs to be strengthened to ensure evidence-based policies for environmental sustainability.[16]
  • Monitoring challenges: Countries face many challenges in monitoring the MDG 7 indicators. These include unreliable and inaccessible data, a lack of statistical capacities, as well as difficulties related to lack of public awareness, legislative and regulatory frameworks, inadequate human resource capacity and the need for more partnerships.
  • Lack of participation: The insufficient participation of stakeholders at all levels, including the marginalized and those most affected by a lack of environmental sustainability, is frequently mentioned as a major obstacle to progress. Consequently, there is a need to empower everyone to participate in efforts towards environmental sustainability through education, public awareness and training. Participation also implies taking into account the local context and the cultural dimension, as well as recognizing the relevance of free, independent and pluralistic media for progress towards environmental sustainability.
  • Other obstacles to progress: Lack of political will, pressure on environmental resources from high use and “natural hazards and other external shocks[17], insufficient governance and planning policies, a lack of “science, education, media and culture for environmental sustainability[18], social unrest and lack of financial resources are among the challenges contributing to insufficient progress on environmental sustainability. One of the main challenges is the lack of coordination among national institutions and authorities stemming from an unclear definition of roles and responsibilities. Collaboration among the donors also presents difficulties in terms of country priorities versus those of the donor community. Another major issue is the lack of commitment regarding the necessary national investments to achieve MDG 7, pointing to the fact that targeted interventions and investments in environmental sustainability can have strong positive impacts.

 

Concluding Thoughts

MDG 7 “fails to address the motors driving impoverished populations from the countryside into cities.”[19]  “Failures to reach global targets in relation to halting biodiversity loss have added further stresses to vulnerable peoples and communities. Biodiversity, ecosystems and the services they provide are the foundations on which all people rely.[20] Indeed, the future development framework will need to, among others “adequately recognize the gender dimensions in several of the other but, MDG3 targets, including MDG7 on environmental sustainability[21], to “adequately reflect the importance of conserving and restoring natural systems as a component of strategies to reach other development targets[22]. A future development framework needs to be more comprehensive regarding environmental sustainability and address priority areas, such as the ocean, for example, which were absent from the MDGs.

MDGs lack clarity on how to tailor global targets to national realities and regional dynamics[23]. Furthermore, MDGs have been criticized as they deal “with issues in ‘silos’, which undermine the ability to address environmental sustainability and human well-being in an integrated way. At the same time, given their significance, environmental sustainability and social equity must be specifically recognizable and measurable elements of goal statements, targets or indicators in order to be effectively addressed.[24]Moreover, the underlying drivers of poverty were not addressed. Therefore, the significance of environmental sustainability demands specific attention so it is fully recognized and effectively addressed.[25] It has been further argued that the global targets have missed out on addressing local issues, due to “a lack of genuine participation in both framing and implementing environmental sustainability objectives…leading to badly planned out or ill-adapted projects.”[26] Therefore, the MDGs have, in some cases, “not benefitted the most impoverished and socially excluded people.[27]

A 2012 Thematic Paper on MDG 7 shows that this goal won’t be reached by 2015 unless we bring changes to the way development occurs.  This motivates for the need for “truly forward-looking development goals. … focusing also on the needs of people who will be born over the next years.”[28] Furthermore, CAN International and Beyond 2015 noted that it was a “lost opportunity that the MDGs did not provide guidance on how to address the root causes of poverty and environmental degradation, such as inequality within and between countries”.


Key Background Documents

UN DESA and UNDP, 2012. Synthesis of National Reports for Rio+20: http://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/742RIO+20_Synthesis_Report_Final.pdf

UNDG, 2010. Thematic Paper on MDG7 Environmental Sustainability: http://www.undg.org/docs/11421/MDG7_1954-UNDG-MDG7-LR.pdf

UNDP, 2010. The Path to Achieving the Millennium Development Goals:  A Synthesis of Evidence from Around the World

http://content.undp.org/go/cms-service/stream/asset/?asset_id=2677427

UNDP, 2006. Making Progress on Environmental Sustainability: Lessons and Recommendations from a Review of over 150 MDG Country Experiences: http://www.undp.org/content/dam/aplaws/publication/en/publications/environment-energy/www-ee-library/mainstreaming/making-progress-on-environmental-sustainability/mdg7english.pdf

United Nations, 2012. The Millennium Development Goals Report 2012: http://mdgs.un.org/unsd/mdg/Resources/Static/Products/Progress2012/English2012.pdf

UN System Task Team on the Post-2015 UN Development Agenda, 2012. Realizing the Future We Want for All. Report to the Secretary-General: http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/pdf/Post_2015_UNTTreport.pdf


Annex A: Progress on MDG7

http://unstats.un.org/unsd/mdg/Host.aspx?Content=Products/ProgressReports.htm

 



[1] UN DESA and UNDP. 2012. Synthesis of National Reports for Rio+20: http://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/742RIO+20_Synthesis_Report_Final.pdf

[2] UN System Task Team on the Post-2015 UN Development Agenda (2012). (See reference above).

[3] Geremew Sahilu Gebrie, submitted discussion note

[4] Hui-Chi Goh, submitted discussion note

[5] Realizing the Future We Want for All, Report to the Secretary General; UN System Task Team on the Post 2015 Development Agenda, New York June 2012.

[6] Thematic paper on MDG7 Environmental Sustainability prepared by the UNDG Task Force on MDGs for the 2010 Global MDG Summit

[7] Thematic paper on MDG7 Environmental Sustainability prepared by the UNDG Task Force on MDGs for the 2010 Global MDG Summit

[8] Realizing the Future We Want for All, Report to the Secretary General; UN System Task Team on the Post 2015 Development Agenda, New York June 2012.

[9] Global assessment reports (from 2005 to 2012) are available at: http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/reports.shtml

[10] United Nations. 2012. The Millennium Development Goals Report 2012: http://mdgs.un.org/unsd/mdg/Resources/Static/Products/Progress2012/English2012.pdf

[11] Patricia McArdle, submitted discussion note

[12] These have been identified in both the UNDG Thematic Paper on Environmental Sustainability (2010) and the UNDP report on Making Progress on Environmental Sustainability (2006).

22 “A Decade of National MDG Reports: What are we learning?” UNDP Poverty Practice Working Paper (2012)

[13] UNDP, 2010.  The Path to Achieving the MDGs:  A Synthesis of Evidence from Around the World

[14] Harpinder Sandhu, submitted discussion note

[15] UNDP. 2006. Making Progress on Environmental Sustainability: Lessons and Recommendations from a Review of over 150 MDG Country Experiences: http://www.undp.org/content/dam/aplaws/publication/en/publications/environment-energy/www-ee-library/mainstreaming/making-progress-on-environmental-sustainability/mdg7english.pdf

[16] United Nations Secretary-General’s High-level Panel on Global Sustainability. 2012. Resilient People, Resilient Planet: A future worth choosing.

[17] CAN International and Beyond 2015, submitted discussion note

[18] UNESCO, submitted discussion note

[19] Brendan Coyne, submitted discussion note

[20] BirdLife International, submitted discussion note

[21] International Alliance of Women, submitted discussion note

[22] Alejandra Bowles, submitted discussion note

[23] UN System Task Team on the Post-2015 UN Development Agenda (2012). (See reference above).

[24] WWF, submitted discussion note

[25] CAN International and Beyond 2015, submitted discussion note

[26] Brendan Coyne, submitted discussion note

[27] Brendan Coyne, submitted discussion note

[28] Michael Herrman, submitted discussion note

Please DON'T post your comments below. 

To submit your comment:

  1. Visit www.worldwewant2015.org/sustainability2015
  2. Choose any of the weeklong e-discussions.
  3. submit your comment.

 

Topics:
Environmental Sustainability, Sustainability, Growth, Food Security, Health, Water, Gender Equality, Employment, Education, Institutions, Governance, Environmental Degradation, Energy
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Lisinka Ulatowska from
Wed, February 20, 2013 at 03.47 pm
I am unable to locate the comments on the piece I wrote. What must I do? Lisinka.Ultowska@gmail.com
Anonymous from
Tue, February 12, 2013 at 01.28 pm
La desigualdad es uno de los principales problemas de la sustentabilidad ambiental (Inequality is one of the main problems of environmental sustainability)
Helen Kopnina from
Mon, February 11, 2013 at 08.48 pm
I miss ecocentric perspective - a lot of 'environment' seems for human use only and no intrinsic value of other species is recognized
Anonymous from
Wed, February 6, 2013 at 02.19 pm
Initiative fort intéressante, et nécessité de bien capitaliser les acquis potentiels!
Asutosh Satpathy from
Wed, February 6, 2013 at 11.59 am
Sustainable Inclusive Framework For Development

Asutosh Satpathy, Ph.D.
Resource Development Centre, New Delhi, India

Selected Issues

1. Rural renewal
The issue is how we are going to redress, on the one side, inequitable distributions of environmental burdens, i.e. pollution of air, water and soil; unchecked urbanization and industrialization; societal norms; crimes; etc., and on the other, efficient access to environmental goods, i.e. clean air & water; decent living with food, shelter, health care, education and income earning sources; recreation, transportation; etc., in a variety of situations.
The concern that arises here is about prioritization for a sustainable inclusive framework for development. The concern is about unchecked commercialization that is pushing agricultural farming and farm practices to an increasingly low priority level in developing countries, especially in India. As stated above, the main criterion of the unchecked urbanization and commercialization process is the hard monetary value of any activity, services, process or product in the market. The more monetarily valued, as obtained in the market, is given higher credence, while others getting less market value are relegated in terms of priority. In this prioritization process gets affected as it involves pushing a large number of population, more in the category of marginalized communities, indigenous people, minorities and women, to a state of deprivation, disabling the enabling mechanisms to get access to a decent living with food, shelter, health care, education and income earning sources. Further, the deprivation process becomes more acute as agricultural areas are gradually being encroached by the expanding urbanization and industrial process. The grim consequence is constricting the access route to environmental justice.
The consequent effect, I repeat in this forum, is a chain of happenings: further marginalization of indigenous people and minorities, displacement from habitation, forced population migration for better monetary income, declining farm produce & price rise, an increase in levels of pollution of air & water, concentration of population & high density level of structures in areas that help in commercial activities of non-agricultural produces, increase in transportation network, pressure on farm products, water supply and energy resources to meet the demand of commercial undertakings.
The development framework should be sustainable as well as inclusive. In this process the priorities need to be identified.
i. The first and most is recognizing the right of the disadvantaged communities, including tribal, indigenous people, minorities and women, to live in their habitat. Required legislation to that effect is essential to guarantee their rights. Habitat is everything for them, where they live, learn, work, play and pray. Their way of life, education, knowledge, skills and living is in relation to their habitat and environment. They have been there for generations. Their voluntary movement beyond their habitat may be for better education, living, etc., and that should not be equated with forced movement or displacement. Forced habitat displacement should not be allowed at any cost. The development of special economic zones (SEZs), mining based industrialization, among others, in India are cases in points. Most of these SEZs are being developed by acquiring agricultural and forest lands for undertaking non-agricultural non-forest based activities on a commercial scale. This involves forcible land acquisition and deforestation, as well. Habitat displacement leads to a chain of reactions including normlessness, erosion of values, loss of livelihood and traditional skill-based income generation activities, etc. For generations a scale of priorities, learning and activities cycle is organically developed in relation to the habitat and environment. Now when habitat is displaced everything is displaced.
ii. Rural renewal calls for attention on agriculture and agricultural farm practices so as to make rural areas an epicentre of sustainable living; public investment on rural infrastructure, education, health and communication. Therefore, strengthening of agricultural farm practices in terms of areas and naturalized inputs is required.
iii. Public policy on rural urban continuum and not towards making a dichotomous of the two. There is a need for developmental investment policy priorities from centre (urban/city centres) to peripheries (rural areas). Further, Metropolitan / Urban area centre (e.g. National Capital Region) development programme priorities need to be changed in favour of rural areas or clusters for equitable distribution of national resources. Consequently, more investment in metropolitan/urban area centre means more migration of population to such areas for income and employment leading to pressure on land, water, energy resources, etc.

Rural renewal is to refocus on improving agricultural farm practices as well as habitat conservation and development. Food basket of a nation is intertwined with agricultural farm practices that are interlinked with rural development. Focus on development should always be a continual process along with urbanization. Urbanization is fine but should not be an extracting venture through encroachment.

2. Environment
Change is the Unchanging Law of Nature. And Climate change is part of that unchanging Law of Nature.
The point is how we are going to adopt and manage climate change through our various habit and practices, ranging from individual, community and organizational levels to national and global levels. It is a matter of harmonious coexistence vis-à-vis self-centric, short and brutish life. We need to be accommodative not only at the individual realm but also at community, organizational, national and international realm. We need not have to make broad policy announcements at national governmental and intergovernmental forums, but we need to manage the competing conflict for domination based on perceptions, ideas, belief and practices at individual, community and organizational levels to national and international levels.

3. Means end relationships
Competition should be a way of life and is essential for growth and development. It is healthy to adopt such a mode as long as it is for coexistence and is disastrous when it leads to domination. The real tryst is how we are going to manage. It involves a number spheres of our lives associated with: individual, family, community, organizational, national and global. And we need to ponder the most crucial aspect of management, i.e. means end relationships. As for example, in a child’s school educational career recognition flows to him when he attends the coveted grades earmark for outstanding academic performance. Some tries to achieve through sheer hard work, some through extra tutorial inputs and some through other unrecognized mechanisms. The objective for the child is achieving outstanding grade academically but means varies from child to child. The same applies to community, organizational, national and international arena.
The suggestion that I can attempt to make at this conjuncture to the thinking community is the question of means end relationships. We have to and need to ponder on this question as it is essential for a life of coexistence in harmony with others and nature, as well.
Consultation Team from
Wed, February 6, 2013 at 11.37 pm
Dear Asutosh Satpathy,
Thank you for your comment.

We want to invite you to re-post your comment on the e-discussion thread: http://www.worldwewant2015.org/node/305774

Please let us know if you need help doing so.

We look forward to your comment on the discussion thread.

Thank you,
Consultation team
Anonymous from
Wed, February 6, 2013 at 02.16 pm
C'est trop clair que c'est ces inégalités qui sont à la base de l'exode rurale, les migrations intra et extra- continentales. Donc le développement du monde rural renversera la tendance.
Anonymous from
Wed, February 6, 2013 at 06.37 am
The main lesson I see from the MDG7's achievement in developing the post-2015 development agenda that need to be underscored is the role of private sector and how they can be tamed to respect international laws and commitments related to environmental sustainability. Many times, the transnational corporations wield 'substantive power' that they arm twist developing country governments that are in need of investment opportunities. The result is environmental abuse, selective implementation of the law such that the poor are charged for abuse while the rich walk 'scot free': http://www.oecd.org/env/1819582.pdf

In my view therefore, the post-2015 agenda needs to address the investment climate - to secure its compliance to international environmental standards, build national capacities for independent monitoring of this through the unencumbered public access to environmental information by CSOs and the media / public disclosure of environmental information by companies, skills development in documentation, research and analyses at the national levels.

In addition, the role of the growing population cannot be underestimated in the Post-2015 development framework. I would argue for more efforts to provide options and opportunities to promote sustainable living in key sectors like household energy use, waster conservation for domestic and productive uses, management of waste, housing provision that takes into account the diminishing resources and the need to conserve them etc
Consultation Team from
Wed, February 6, 2013 at 11.42 pm
Dear Kimbowa Richard,

Thank you for your comment and for taking the time to read our framing paper.

We want to ask you to re-post your comment on the e-discussion thread: http://www.worldwewant2015.org/node/305774 We also want to encourage our participants to upload a picture to their profile.

Please let us know if you need help doing so.

Thank you.
Consultation team
Anonymous from
Wed, February 6, 2013 at 02.23 pm
Vous savez, la croissance démographique mondiale est inquiétante pour l'environnement.il faut effectivement des recherches, des études sur sa protection si non..............
Anonymous from
Tue, February 5, 2013 at 08.57 pm
I believe that E-Discussions is the way to get more and more of the populations involved. I believe that people are interested in improving their environment, when it can clearly and practically be shown to better their living, livelihood; family and community well being!
Anonymous from
Tue, February 5, 2013 at 06.18 pm
I expect more from the e discussion regarding environmental degradation
Anonymous from
Tue, February 5, 2013 at 05.39 pm
peoples participation and willingness to fight environmental degradation are the major forces in the fast growing population especially in asian countries. Although the generation of data bank may only create a virtual plateform for mathematical and data analysis and modeling.
Dossè SOSSOUGA from
Tue, February 5, 2013 at 04.20 pm
Le développement de l'environnement est obligatoire pour la survie de l'homme sur la planète terre.
Anonymous from
Tue, February 5, 2013 at 10.36 am
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Anonymous from
Tue, February 5, 2013 at 06.14 am
Nice Initiative indeed!Greetings,peace, love n Best Regards from Bangladesh.
Anonymous from
Tue, February 5, 2013 at 03.21 am
with energy efficiency

To make our world more energy-efficient, Siemens increases the efficiency of power generation, uses smart grids and power-saving energy transmission and distribution, expands the use of renewable energy and develops energy-efficient solutions for power supply and access.

In North Africa 99 percent of the population has access to electricity. But how is the situation in other African regions? In Sub-Saharan Africa, for instance, only about 30 percent can use electricity. Approximately 560 million Africans do not have access to reliable electricity. 75 percent of the generated power is consumed in the five countries Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, and South Africa.

Siemens aims to help improve the situation. If fossil fuels were the only energy sources used for power generation the CO2 emissions on the African continent would increase dramatically. Thus, the use of renewable energy becomes more and more important.

The South African government, for example, is investing significantly in the construction of a new energy infrastructure and in upgrading the existing networks. The country also plans to change the energy mix to be able to provide 40 percent of the energy from renewable sources by 2030.

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Energy efficiency in Africa
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To make our world more energy-efficient, Siemens increases the efficiency of power generation, uses smart grids and power-saving energy transmission and distribution, expands the use of renewable energy and develops energy-efficient solutions for power supply and access.

In North Africa 99 percent of the population has access to electricity. But how is the situation in other African regions? In Sub-Saharan Africa, for instance, only about 30 percent can use electricity. Approximately 560 million Africans do not have access to reliable electricity. 75 percent of the generated power is consumed in the five countries Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, and South Africa.

Siemens aims to help improve the situation. If fossil fuels were the only energy sources used for power generation the CO2 emissions on the African continent would increase dramatically. Thus, the use of renewable energy becomes more and more important.

The South African government, for example, is investing significantly in the construction of a new energy infrastructure and in upgrading the existing networks. The country also plans to change the energy mix to be able to provide 40 percent of the energy from renewable sources by 2030.

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Slide 2
Slide 3
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The world's most powerful gas turbine
Reliable power generation

Steam and gas turbines or combined-cycle power plants are a basic prerequisite for achieving higher energy efficiency. In 2007, the world’s most powerful and efficient gas turbine - produced by Siemens - went into operation.
Power generation
Smart grid and energy transmission
Smart grid and energy transmission

A smart grid comprises all elements of the energy conversion chain from power generation to the end consumer.
Smart grid and energy transmission
Wind energy
Resource-conserving renewable energies

Renewable energies like wind power and solar power are sources for eco-friendly and resource-conserving power generation.
Renewable energy
Off-grid lighting at Lake Victoria
Off-grid lighting at Lake Victoria

At Lake Victoria, Osram built solar-powered energy stations (O-hubs) where residents can recharge batteries for energy-saving lamps.
Power supply and access

Siemens is the world’s leading provider of comprehensive green solutions along the entire energy conversion chain. In fiscal 2014, we want to exceed the €40 billion revenue mark with green technologies. In fiscal 2012, our Environmental Portfolio, which features a large number of innovations, generated revenue of €33.2 billion enabling our customers to cut their CO2 emissions by 332 million tons – an amount equal to about 41% of the CO2 emissions generated in Germany in 2010.

Find more information on how Siemens can install energy-efficient infrastructures in Africa with reliable power generation, energy-saving power transmission and distribution, the use of renewable energy as well as with sustainable energy supply and access.

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Hulisani Nemaxwi
Hulisani Nemaxwi Siemens South Africa Send a message

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Energy-efficient projects in Africa
From optimized gas turbine technology in Algeria, to energy-efficient power plants in South Africa and reliable energy supply for the 2010 World Cup, Siemens has proven solutions to help improve energy-efficiency in all regions of Africa.

Discover Siemens in Africa

Gas turbine

Gas turbines
Siemens supplies gas turbines for the industry and large-scale plants for the 50- and 60-Hertz markets. They are used in gas, steam and combined-cycle power
plants.

Wind farm

Renewable energy
Siemens produces wind turbines, supports major photovoltaic projects, and develops the most advanced technologies for solar-thermal power plants.

Combined-cycle power plants

Combined-cycle power plants
Siemens’ combined-cycle power plants provide an optimum balance between capital cost, plant performance, and operational and maintenance considerations.

Siemens Energy Africa
Siemens Smart Grid
Power Plants
Energy Service Balancing Centre

News from the social media network

TheEnergyCollective
Siemens in Africa on Facebook
Siemens in Africa on Twitter
Exploring the energy mix
Energy efficiency in the blogosphere

Further topics

Energy Energy The world is full of energy. However, energy needs to be converted into power in order to make use of it.
Electric cars in Africa Electric cars With many years of experience in energy, mobility, and IT, Siemens is perfectly placed to pioneer a new era of sustainable transport.
Sustainable development Sustainable development
in cities Intelligent power grids, new traffic concepts, and green buildings make rapid urbanization more sustainable.

Industrial engineering Industrial engineering Faster, better, and economical production – improved process management is the key to success.
African Green City Index African Green City Index Cities from the south and the north of Africa deliver the best environmental performance of all major African cities.
Healthcare – Siemens Southern Africa Efficient healthcare Everyone should have access to affordable and efficient healthcare that ensures good medical treatment.

Energy efficiency on the Web

Energy-saving calculator
Wikipedia: Energy efficient use
Southern African Association for Energy Efficiency: Energy efficiency
African Energy Commission: Approach to energy efficiency in Africa
Desertec Initiative

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